WMU Home

Biebrich Scarlet for Fluorescent Staining of Cells



Product: Biebrich Scarlet for Fluorescent Staining of Cells

Development Stage: Market Validation

Primary Inventors: Robert Eversole, PhD, Department of Biological Sciences

License Status: Available for non-exclusive licensing

Patent Status: US 5,952,192

Reference: 1996-004

Contact: Clark Bennett PhD
dclark.bennett@wmich.edu
269-387-8285

Download PDF



     The use of fluorescent markers/stains to examine cells has become very popular. Fluorescent stains have many advantages over traditional staining dyes. Fluorescent stains do not limit the analysis of microscopy specimens to the interference property of transmitted light and provide point sources of narrow band emission spectra as opposed to the transmission of full spectrum light through the entire thickness of a sample under bright field microscopy. Fluorescent markers often provide better three- dimensional imaging than common bright field stains and have exceptional clarity for labeled objects near the objective. The improved signal-to-noise ratio from a fluorescent stain can result in better resolution when imaging thick biological specimens and/or tissue sections.
     Because of the shallow depth of field with a confocal laser scanning microscope, use of fluorescent stains with this microscope selectively limits the information gathered to a small section of the whole sample. This eliminates the background and scattered fluorescence produced by the rest of the specimen and improves the contrast, clarity and detection of the labeled structures.

Technology Description
     Researchers at Western Michigan University have developed a fluorescent stain that has exemplary spectral properties, is soluble in water at a neutral pH, is capable of forming covalent bonds with cellular constituents in order to prevent the dye from redistributing during tissue preparation and analysis and specificity stains certain cellular organelles.
     The stain, Biebrich scarlet, is photo-fixing and is especially useful for identifying eosinophils by binding to their cytoplasmic granules in tissue samples from 6 to 60 microns in thickness. It also stains granules of macrophage and granular lymphocytes.

Potential Benefits
  • Fluorescent labeling of white cells in tissue samples
  • Specific labeling of eosinophil granules
  • High contrast labeling
  • Covalently labels cell organelles

Biebrich Scarlet for Fluorescent Staining of Cells


     The use of fluorescent markers/stains to examine cells has become very popular. Fluorescent stains have many advantages over traditional staining dyes. Fluorescent stains do not limit the analysis of microscopy specimens to the interference property of transmitted light and provide point sources of narrow band emission spectra as opposed to the transmission of full spectrum light through the entire thickness of a sample under bright field microscopy. Fluorescent markers often provide better three- dimensional imaging than common bright field stains and have exceptional clarity for labeled objects near the objective. The improved signal-to-noise ratio from a fluorescent stain can result in better resolution when imaging thick biological specimens and/or tissue sections.
     Because of the shallow depth of field with a confocal laser scanning microscope, use of fluorescent stains with this microscope selectively limits the information gathered to a small section of the whole sample. This eliminates the background and scattered fluorescence produced by the rest of the specimen and improves the contrast, clarity and detection of the labeled structures.

Technology Description
     Researchers at Western Michigan University have developed a fluorescent stain that has exemplary spectral properties, is soluble in water at a neutral pH, is capable of forming covalent bonds with cellular constituents in order to prevent the dye from redistributing during tissue preparation and analysis and specificity stains certain cellular organelles.
     The stain, Biebrich scarlet, is photo-fixing and is especially useful for identifying eosinophils by binding to their cytoplasmic granules in tissue samples from 6 to 60 microns in thickness. It also stains granules of macrophage and granular lymphocytes.

Potential Benefits
  • Fluorescent labeling of white cells in tissue samples
  • Specific labeling of eosinophil granules
  • High contrast labeling
  • Covalently labels cell organelles

Product: Biebrich Scarlet for Fluorescent Staining of Cells

Development Stage: Market Validation

Primary Inventors: Robert Eversole, PhD, Department of Biological Sciences

License Status: Available for non-exclusive licensing

Patent Status: US 5,952,192

Reference: 1996-004

Contact: Clark Bennett PhD
dclark.bennett@wmich.edu
269-387-8285

Download PDF